Depression: A Hidden Risk Among International Students

This Lunar New Year, I’m thinking about the tens of thousands of Chinese and Vietnamese international students in the US who are unable to spend this joyous time with their families.

I wasn’t homesick when I spent my first Lunar New Year away from my family and all things familiar to me. Having left my country, Singapore, a month prior to that for graduate school in Seattle, I found everything here exciting: the short and chilly days, American food, friendly service in stores, free speech. I was thrilled at the prospect of fitting in, of perhaps adopting a new identity. I couldn’t wait to be Americanized. Continue reading

When Domestic Violence Erupts…

I read with great sadness in today’s paper about a 28-year-old mother of four found killed in her apartment. She had twice sought protection orders against her violent ex-boyfriend. In one petition, she expressed a resignation that “a piece of paper isn’t going to save my life when he finally gets me, but at least you know who killed me.” Continue reading

Ring In the New (Habits)

You’ve made your New Year’s resolutions. You’ve learned from your past experiences and feel better prepared for challenges ahead that may sway your determination. You kick the new year off in the right gear and feel hopeful you’ll do it right this time. You’ve even scoured the Internet to learn the tricks to keeping your resolutions. Now let’s add one more to your bag of tools to increase your chances of success. Continue reading

What’s Keeping You From Keeping Your Resolutions?

Every year, an estimated 50% of American adults make New Year’s resolutions. Yet, researchers have found that most people start backsliding after two months, eventually ending up to where they used to be by the end of the year. Sounds familiar?

If you have ever given up on your New Year’s resolutions (only to find yourself making the same ones a year on), you may have been set back by the following: Continue reading

Feeling Ignored? Your Partner May be Stonewalling (4 Destructive Forces, Part 4)

When you share your thoughts and feelings with someone, or recount how your day went, you expect the listener to respond in some way to indicate interest and attention – the verbal “uh-huh,” the raised eyebrow, the eye contact. Receiving such feedback is important because it deepens your connection with the listener. But what if you do not get any of that? And what if this person is your spouse, and you’re telling him or her something important? Does it set off a red flag in your mind that your marriage could be in trouble? Continue reading

The Strongest Predictor of Divorce (Destructive Forces, Part 3)

Have you ever given your partner the eye-roll when you’re exasperated with their constant nagging? Or called them out on their grammatical faux pas in the midst of an argument? How about mocking them in retaliation for what you deemed to be an unfair accusation?

Every time you do this, you are showing contempt for your partner. And contempt is bad news. Continue reading